Carolina organization creates field hospital for Ukrainian refugees

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More U.S. aid is on the way for Ukrainians fleeing Russian attacks. Samaritan’s Purse says about 91 people across Eastern Europe administer medical care and basic care to tens of thousands of people. “It’s one of the worst, if not the worst they’ve seen,” Samaritan’s Purse spokeswoman Melissa Strickland said. Samaritan’s Purse is building an emergency field hospital in Lviv, Ukraine. Officials say it will be able to handle up to 100 emergency room patients a day and up to 14 trauma surgeries a day. “You feel like you’re in a WWII movie when you’re in there,” she said. Strickland says the hospital is almost ready to start seeing patients. “Samaritan’s Purse President Franklin Graham will often say, ‘We’re running through fire,'” Strickland said. She says they’ve also built an outpatient clinic at a train station in Lviv to help provide care for people who pass by each day. “They just pile into these trains,” Strickland said. “They’re just stuffed. People are packed in like sardines and there’s a huge medical need. It’s an arduous journey. They’re going through areas that are being bombed.” Strickland says there are other community members at the station handing out soup and providing tents for people to come out of the freezing cold. “You have sick children, women who have actually gone into labor and given birth on the trains,” she said. She says tens of thousands of people are streaming into the station every day from across the east of Ukraine. “The men are staying in the country, but the women and children are fleeing,” Strickland said. “Women will often carry a child, toddler, or small baby in one arm and then all the possessions they have left in the world in a small plastic grocery bag in the other hand.” She says the looks of people getting off the train show the devastation the war is wreaking on the country. “When they come out of the trains, there’s just a blank stare, and you realize where they’re coming from, they just ran,” Strickland said. Samaritan’s Purse has dozens of employees reaching these families in Poland, Romania, Moldova and western Ukraine with medical care, food and basic necessities. “You see men taking their wives and children to the border, and the husbands and wives are shaking hands really hard, and then they have to let go,” Strickland said. Strickland says the best way people in the United States can help is by donating money. She says it is very difficult to send and transport supplies, food and other items over such a distance. You can find more information on how to help through Samaritan’s Purse here.

More U.S. aid is on the way for Ukrainians fleeing Russian attacks.

Samaritan’s Purse says about 91 people across Eastern Europe administer medical care and basic care to tens of thousands of people.

“It’s one of the worst, if not the worst they’ve seen,” Samaritan’s Purse spokeswoman Melissa Strickland said.

Samaritan’s Purse is building an emergency field hospital in Lviv, Ukraine. Officials say it will be able to handle up to 100 emergency room patients a day and up to 14 trauma surgeries a day.

“You feel like you’re in a WWII movie when you’re in it,” she said.

Strickland says the hospital is almost ready to start seeing patients.

“Samaritan’s Purse president Franklin Graham will often say, ‘We’re running into fire,'” Strickland said.

She says they also built an outpatient clinic at a train station in Lviv to help provide care for people passing through each day.

“They’re just piling into these trains,” Strickland said. “They’re just stuffed. People are packed in like sardines and there’s a huge medical need. It’s an arduous journey. They’re going through areas that are bombed.

Strickland says there are other community members at the station handing out soup and providing tents for people to come out of the freezing cold.

“You have sick children, women who have given birth and given birth on trains,” she said.

She says tens of thousands of people flock to the station every day from across eastern Ukraine.

“The men stay in the country, but the women and children flee,” Strickland said. “Women will often carry a child, toddler, or small baby in one arm, then all the possessions they have left in the world in a small plastic grocery bag in the other hand.

She says the looks of people getting off the train show the toll war is taking on the country.

“When they come out of the trains, there’s just a blank stare, and you realize where they’re coming from, they just ran,” Strickland said.

Samaritan’s Purse has dozens of employees who meet these families in Poland, Romania, Moldova and western Ukraine with medical care, food and basic necessities.

“You see men walking their wives and children to the border, and husbands and wives are shaking hands really hard and then they have to let go,” Strickland said.

Strickland says the best way people in the United States can help is to donate money. She says it is very difficult to send and transport supplies, food and other items over such a distance.

You can find more information on how to help through Samaritan’s Purse here.

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